Tuesday, October 17, 2006

GOD SAVE THE KING


Not that public opinion cared or even took much note, but today was the most important milestone in the history of this country.

The republic effectively ended today with the signing of the "Military Commissions Act."

With this new law the country became a place in which the president/commander in chief can classify whomever he likes as an enemy combatant beyond the reach of habeas corpus. This means that the executive branch can arrest and hold without trial anyone in the world (including American citizens). He can also hold that prisoner indefinitely without confronting the detained with the case against him/her or the evidence involved.

You are now "subjects" and not citizens.

If you watched Generals Hayden and Pace who were artfully positioned behind the sovereign at the signing, you saw a lot of blinking. They know what they have done, and so does Senator Warner.

The legislation also set the standards under which you can be tortured.

Anyone who thinks this is for someone in another country should think again. The GWOT is a false metaphor. The neoconservatives real enemies are in this country and it is up to them to say who those enemies are.

President George W. Bush looks up as he signs the Military Commissions Act of 2006 in the East Room of the White House in Washington, October 17, 2006. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld (C) and Vice President Dick Cheney listen to U.S. President George W. Bush speak before signing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 in the East Room of the White House in Washington October 17, 2006. The legislation sets standards for interrogating suspects, but through a complex set of rules that human rights groups say could allow harsh techniques bordering on torture, such as sleep deprivation and induced hypothermia. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)

U.S. President George W. Bush shakes hands after signing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 in the East Room of the White House in Washington October 17, 2006. The legislation sets standards for interrogating suspects, but through a complex set of rules that human rights groups say could allow harsh techniques bordering on torture, such as sleep deprivation and induced hypothermia. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)

U.S. President George W. Bush speaks before signing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 in the East Room of the White House in Washington October 17, 2006. With Bush from left are Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Peter Pace, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and Vice President Dick Cheney. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)

U.S. President George W. Bush speaks before signing the Military Commissions Act of 2006 in the East Room of the White House in Washington October 17, 2006. With Bush are (from L) CIA Director Michael Hayden, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Peter Pace, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales, Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld and Vice President Dick Cheney. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)

President Bush looks towards lawmakers as he gets ready to sign the Military Commissions Act of 2006, which sets new standards expediting the interrogation and prosecution of terror suspects, during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 17, 2006. Looking on, from left are: Rep. Chris Cannon, R-Utah; Rep. Steve Buyer, R-Ind.; Rep. James Sensenbrenner, R-Wis.; Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; Rep. Duncan Hunter, R-Calif.; Sen. John Warner, R-Va. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

1 comment:

Renegade Eye said...

Good post.

Expect people classified as terrorists, to be political activists, some probably pacifist.

I found this blog, at Latin American News Review.